Kids playing

Moment in Mandalay

People had talked about Mandalay and I wanted to leave the place behind before I had even arrived. I thought I’d be happier that way. I was sitting on a bus from Bagan to Mandalay. The driver was pushing the throttle a bit too much.

The dusty and dry air in Bagan lead me to think that a big city like Mandalay would not be any better. It turned out I was right but there where other things that caught my attention. After buying a train ticket to Hispaw I had half a day to explore the streets of the city.
Woman washing herself in river Iravadi
Woman washing herself in river Iravadi
Evening transportation up the river Iravadi
Evening transportation up the river Iravadi

I don’t feel at ease when I walk from an ice cream bar to a shack town. Only questions without answers arise when looking at people using the murky river to wash themselves after a long day. This wide river bank was their toilet, backyard, playground, workplace and home at the same time. I tried but could not find the photo I was searching to do justice for the feeling I was experiencing.

Clash of Clans and Angry Birds got here before me
Clash of Clans and Angry Birds from Finland got here before me
Kids playing
Kids playing
Smaller branch of the river in Mandalay
Smaller branch of the river in Mandalay
Boy washing his feet
Boy washing his feet
Woman selling street food in Mandalay
Woman selling street food in Mandalay

I was passing through on this random search for sunsets and beauty when most of the world was looking to feed their families and stay healthy in conditions where the odds where not in their favor. A stone throw away from a shack town an amusement park was being build.  Roller coaster and karaoke bar with neon lights across the street was too strong of a contrast for me to digest.

Men looking at construction work behind the fence
Men looking at construction site behind the fence
I took the photos and walked away.
4a.m the train rolled out of Mandalay.
Beautiful people lived in that city.

4 a.m
4 a.m
Some guide-book worthy famous bridge
Some guide-book worthy famous bridge
Tourist carriage of the train
Tourist carriage of the train

Yangon fills your thirst

Water of life

You can refill you water bottle almost anywhere, leave your belongings unguarded and trust the words spoken. You can also practice hackling, negotiating and skepticism or even distrust but it doesn’t seem to be part of the culture. Myanmar, as many kept telling me “is not corrupted by tourism, yet”. The leaders and military might act differently but I met none of them. On the streets there is trust.
Water in a clay pot
Water in a clay pot

Booming city with Indian and Western influence

Foreign money is pouring into the country and not just from the pockets of travelers wanting to see beautiful sunsets and pagodas but from big corporations and governments wanting to invest. Yet Yangon is still a chaotic city where skyscrapers are kept at bay by street vendors selling fake smart phones and 20 cent milk tea. Downtown is full of markets, temples and people spitting excessive beetle juice from their mouths. Walking anywhere feels safe and smiles are returned from strangers.

Man leaning to a tree
Man leaning to a tree
Meat markets smell the same everywhere
Meat markets smell the same everywhere
Tea-man
Tea-man
Talkative man who liked taking selfies with foreigners
Talkative man who liked taking selfies with foreigners
Construction worker
Construction worker
Sneak peak to a closed street behind the guest house
Sneak peak to a closed street behind the guest house
Ferry crossing over the Yangon river
Ferry crossing over the Yangon river
Man cooking lunch
Man cooking lunch
2 boys next to Kandawgyi lake in Yangon
2 boys next to Kandawgyi lake in Yangon
3 young mechanichs
Kick volleyball / chin lone / Sepak takraw
Kick volleyball / chin lone / Sepak takraw
Boom box monk
Boom box monk
Streets of Yangon at night
Streets of Yangon at night

Run for the Myanmar border

Big two part mural inside a restaurant close to all the embassies in Yangon
Big two part mural inside a restaurant close to all the embassies in Yangon

Getting to Myanmar was a bit of a race against time. Border crossings are getting easier each year and acquiring an E-visa is a simple procedure for many nationalities. Nevertheless out-dated information can cause some headache.

I was in Pai, North Thailand and my initial plan was to cross the border from Mae Sai to Tachileik. I had two days of visa left when during breakfast someone told me that from that part of Myanmar you could not travel to other parts of the country. Roads would be closed for foreigners. Internet seemed to agree with him. Later I found out he was wrong.

After finishing my breakfast I thanked him for the info, changed my plan and started hitchhiking over the mountains down south. Same man warned me that two days was not enough with the route I had chosen.

3 pick-ups and one bus later I made it to the border 30 hours to spare in my visa.

Big two part mural inside a restaurant close to all the embassies in Yangon
Big two part mural inside a restaurant close to all the embassies in Yangon

First Impression

6 a.m. It was a short walk across the bordering bridge from Mae Sot to Myawaddy yet in the dark I could already see I was entering a different reality. Mothers with young children were sitting on the bridge. They were not begging with their words so much as with their presence.

5 minutes of friendly custom formalities and I was free to go. 10 minutes from that I was sitting in a family wagon with 4 local men heading to Hpa-An. With no idea if the price was right (it was) or any common language we set out on the 130 km journey that would take about 3 hours.

Early hours in Myawaddy. The first of the markets starts at 2 a.m.
Early hours in Myawaddy. The first of the markets in Myanmar can start as early as 2 a.m.

The driver stopped to fill up the tank from some local man with his own pump system. Right next to us was a newly build gasoline station empty of customers. After filling the tank the man gave the driver a bottle of water. An hour later our driver saw a car on the side of the road with it’s hood open. He slowed down and handed them the water bottle. No words were exchanged.

We stopped few times to say hi to a friend, wash the car and buy fruits. I was dropped in front of the bus that goes to Yangon. 7 hours later the bus reached the outskirts of the city. Taxis and motorbikes kept asking: “Where you go?” but left me alone after telling them “I don’t know”.

On the side of the highway a man told me to take the same minivan with him. It  would take us to the centre. An hour later he showed me a good hotel and wished me all the best. Thanks to the help of many people on the way I had arrived to a place where I could take a shower and sleep.

Diving for photos at Thiang Og Bay

The first day after the freediving course I went to look for sharks at Thiang Og Bay in Koh Tao. The place is also known as Shark Bay. For taking photos I used a Dicapac waterproof bag and Fujifilm x100. It’s not easy. I’ve tried it before and most of the shots were blurry. This time the not-blurry % was better but still too much luck is involved to my liking.

Cropping required until I can hold my breath longer

Taking photos underwater is hard but this time around it was a way easier. I had learned to relax under the surface and it helped. Next long term challenge is to get a water proof casing for my DSLR.

Usually I don’t crop photos but for now these underwater shots require both post production and cropping. Hope to change that some day in the future.

Don’t know the name but I like it
I think I wont crop photos of sharks. Let’s see how close I can eventually get…
I think this is what a bleaching coral looks like.


 

As you might be able to tell underwater world is a new element for me. I think in the future it will occupy a big part of when I’m not breathing.

Night @ Kosmos Festival

Third KosmosFestival was held in Ristiina. Friends were going there so I decided to tag along. During the first festival in 2014 I was helping with some building. Two years later everything was more superlative with more people and less mosquitos. Good vibes and smiling people.